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Hastings and Prince Edward Public Health
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Extreme Hot Weather

Climate change is resulting in more frequent extreme weather events. We encourage people to take precautions in the event of extreme weather conditions such as extreme cold and extreme heat.

Extreme Hot Weather

When extreme hot and humid weather is predicted, it can put everyone at risk from heat illnesses such as heat stroke, heat exhaustion, heat fainting, heat edema (swelling of hands, feet and ankles), heat rash and heat cramps.

Environment and Climate Change Canada has developed a Heat Warning and Information System for Ontario to give advance warning of heat events. A heat warning is issued in southern Ontario when there will be 2 consecutive days of:

  • 31°C or higher during the day AND 20°C or higher at night, OR
  • Humidex* values of 40°C or higher (*Humidex describes how hot and humid it feels to the average person.)

Identifying Heat Illnesses

Watch for symptoms that include:

  • Dizziness or fainting, nausea or vomiting
  • Headache, rapid breathing and heartbeat
  • Extreme thirst and decreased urination with unusually dark yellow urine

Preventing Heat Illnesses

Heat illnesses are preventable:

  • Stay well hydrated, drink before feeling thirsty (plain water is best)
  • Stay in an air-conditioned place
  • Avoid sun exposure – stay in the shade, wear SPF 30+ sunscreen, a wide brimmed hat, UVA & UVB protective sunglasses, and loose fitting, light coloured, breathable clothing
  • Take cool showers or baths
  • Block the sun out by closing awnings, curtains or blinds during the day
  • Reschedule strenuous outdoor activities or plan them for cooler times of the day
  • Never leave people or pets in a parked vehicle or in direct sunlight
  • Visit neighbours, friends and older family members, especially those who are chronically ill, to make sure that they are cool and hydrated

Homelessness During Extreme Heat Conditions

Individuals experiencing homelessness are at a higher risk of experiencing heat-related illness, as they may not be able to access places to escape high-heat conditions, particularly with the current restrictions in place related to the COVID-19 pandemic. HPEPH has created a resource page and printable fact sheet with tips on how to stay cool for people experiencing homelessness.

Resources:

News, Research and Reports RELATED TO: Drinking Water, Outdoors, Extreme Heat and Cold Warnings

Notice: Public Health Heat Warning

PUBLISHED: Monday July 27, 2020

Notice: Public Health Heat Warning

PUBLISHED: Friday July 17, 2020

Notice: Public Health Heat Warning

PUBLISHED: Monday July 6, 2020

Public Health Heat Warning Extended

PUBLISHED: Monday June 22, 2020

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We are working to respond to community needs during the COVID-19 pandemic.

If you are concerned about potential exposure to a positive case of COVID-19, please be reassured that any contacts of a confirmed case will be contacted directly and monitored by public health.

Low-risk and indirect contacts should self monitor for symptoms for 14 days from the time of potential exposure and seek testing if symptoms develop. Low risk contacts do not need to isolate unless symptoms develop, and can continue to attend school/work/daycare while monitoring for symptoms.

Please continue to visit our website for more information about our programs and services.